Quest Means Business
December 14, 2010
Posted: 2244 GMT
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December 3, 2010
Posted: 839 GMT
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December 1, 2010
Posted: 1624 GMT

Do our bosses inspire you to become a Chief Executive? Or does the very thought of leading a large team scare you off? Please tell us in the comments section (right below here)!

Filed under: Business •Quest Means Business


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November 30, 2010
Posted: 1330 GMT
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November 25, 2010
Posted: 1203 GMT

In the third installment of 'The Boss' series, one of our CEOs ventures out to the Jersey Shores:

Filed under: Business •Quest Means Business


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November 18, 2010
Posted: 1606 GMT
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November 17, 2010
Posted: 1652 GMT
Britain's Prince William asked his girlfriend Kate Middleton to marry him

Britain's Prince William asked his girlfriend Kate Middleton to marry him

The role of royalty in a democratic age. Unelected, some believe unnecessary. But still loved, and revered by so many others.

The role of royalty in an austere age. Outdated and expensive, some critics might say. But for many the source of a welcome good news story. This week’s events in the UK are testament to that.

Royalty divides opinion. A select few born into a life of privilege. A life steeped in tradition, tangled up with history, national pride, rarely affording the chance of a “normal life”.

There’s no doubt the world’s monarchies are never out of the spotlight, and we lap it up. And it’s always been that way. Think of the age-old legends, the royals with blue blood, the princess so delicate she can feel a pea through 20 mattresses, the bleak Russian rumors of the missing Romanov sisters. Our fascination with the royals is as old as the sprawling dynasties themselves.

This week’s Q+A will be delving into this global obsession. Tune in Thursday to watch and leave us ideas for next week’s Q & A in the comments section (right underneath here).

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November 12, 2010
Posted: 1430 GMT
Sub-zero temperatures aside, I'd be lying if I said I didn't enjoy this experience.
Sub-zero temperatures aside, I'd be lying if I said I didn't enjoy this experience.

It didn't look much like sleeping rough. But it certainly felt like it.

More than 400 people slept out in a covered market in the heart of London's financial district to raise money for one of the city's main homeless charities, Centrepoint. There was food, drink, live music, even the odd famous face. There were cardboard boxes, and sacks to sleep on, and everyone brought a sleeping bag. But it's November, Britain is in the grip of some quite violent winds. And the one thing there wasn't was heating.

At around 2 a.m. I encountered a dilemma. My nose was in danger of going numb, but I couldn't find a way of covering it without cutting off my oxygen supply. I pulled my highly inadequate, fluorescent pink sleeping bag over my head, and hoped for the best.

A little while later, the dilemma spread to my feet. I had smuggled in a hot water bottle (hoping to avoid the ritual cries of "cheat" from the other participants) but it was now stone cold. Adding more socks would involve several moments of facing the elements minus sleeping bag. Again I found myself unprepared to make this decision, and opted for doing nothing.

The night ended, much as it had started. With a decision. To go to work, or not to go to work. I knew the whole point was to go. To see what it was like to live on little or no sleep and to take on the same challenges – just with a lot less strength. This was the one decision I made, and made right.

Sub-zero temperatures aside, I'd be lying if I said I didn't enjoy this experience. It was highly organized, safe, and luckily it was a novelty. I'd also be lying if I said I experienced an epiphany about the life of a homeless person. I still wouldn't presume to understand what it's really like. But when I next see someone sleeping rough I might stop and wonder how many night-time dilemmas they encountered, and if they found a way out.

The Centrepoint Sleepout 2010 raised over $200,000 dollars to help young homeless people.

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